Barbara Haward's profile
Name

Barbara Haward

I am a part time student. My previous work experience was working as an industry professional in the area of occupational health and human factors, so I have many years knowledge and experience of  current work related health issues and the impacts of new technologies on humans and their work.

Qualifications

BSc Biological Sciences(Microbiology) - University of Edinburgh

MSc Applied Microbiology - University of Portsmouth 

MSc Health Ergonomics - University of Surrey 

PgC Learning and Teaching in Higher Education  

Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors 

Chartered Member of the Institute of Occupational Safety and Health 

Barbara Haward has not added any research activity to this section yet.
Barbara Haward has not added any teaching activity to this section yet.

PhD Title

Telegraphists' Cramp: the emergence and disappearance of an occupational disease between 1875 and 1930.

PhD Supervisors

Dr Steven Sturdy 

Dr Gayle Davis

PhD Overview

Telegraphists’ Cramp emerged as a result of the introduction of new technology into the perceived “safe office environments” of Post Offices and other telegraph companies and the numbers of workers affected escalated rapidly (from about 700 affected workers in 1908 to about 8000 workers in 1911). Telegraphists' cramp, and the earlier reporting of "writers cramps" were new occupational disorders  with a range of symptoms e.g. pain, stiffness, nerve tenderness and paralysis in the hands and wrists. This led to diagnosis difficulties for those affected, their employers and medical practitioners .

My research has analysed the lifecycle of the disease from a medical, sociopolitical and organisational perspective and represents what I believe to be the first historical account of an occupational musculoskeletal disorder in British workplaces where ill health was contracted as a consequence of introducing new technology into an office based environment. In addition, I have devised two types of models which changed throughout the life cycle of telegraphists’ cramp. The first, a three stage model, provides what I define as a human centred approach where the individual (worker) response is at the heart of the model, situated in and influenced by a wider context of government sociopolitical initiatives e.g. legislation, medical and scientific knowledge theories and practices, and employer (organisational) actions in response to changes. The second extends and develops Ludwik Fleck’s theories of how scientific and medical knowledge is established by thought collectives among communities of experts and lay persons. I have created a three stage Fleck model to explain the interactions between the different groups of stakeholders involved with telegraphists’ cramp. The three stages represent how the collectives emerged and evolved as dynamic changing social networks, influenced by key historical events in the timeline of the disease and in response to the changing medical, political and scientific arguments.

The relevance of telegraphists’ cramp to today's world is that musculoskeletal disorders continue to proliferate with the introduction of new and mobile technologies. In the present day, musculoskeletal ill health and disabling disease resulting from work still occurs.In Britain, the UK Health and Safety Executive report 2.6 million lost working days between 2017 to 2018.

Human Factors / Ergonomics publications  

  1. Haward BM, Lewis CH, Griffin MJ (2009) Motions and crew response on an offshore oil production and storage vessel. Applied Ergonomics 40, pp 904 -914.
  2. Haward BM, Fairlamb P (2005) An evaluation of the impact and effect of the physical agents (vibration) directive on surface coal mining operations in the UK. Presented at the 40th United Kingdom Conference on Human Response to Vibration, held in Liverpool, England, 13-15 September 2005.
  3. Haward BM, Bain A (2002). Human Factors and Naval Ship Safety Procedures. Lloyds of London Conference –Exploiting Naval and Commercial Marine Markets. Lloyds Register, London.
  4. Haward BM, Griffin MJ (2002). Repeatability of grip strength and dexterity tests and the effects of age and gender. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 75 (1-2) 111-120.  
  5. Haward BM, Griffin MJ (2000). Hand function tests for workers exposed to hand –transmitted vibration. Contemporary ergonomics 2000(edited McCabe, Hanson et al ) 281-286.
  6. Palmer KT, Haward BM et al. (2000) Validity of self reported occupational exposures to hand–transmitted and whole body vibration. Occupational and Environmental Medicine 57(4) 237-241.
  7. Haward BM, Lewis CH, Griffin MJ (2000). Crew response to motions of an offshore oil production and storage vessel. RINA International Conference Human Factors in Ship Design and Operation, RINA London.
  8. Haward BM, Palmer KT et al (1999). The validity of self-reported information on exposures to hand-transmitted vibration. Haward BM (1999). Proceedings of the 34th meeting of the UK group on Human Response to Vibration, ISVR, University of Southampton, Southampton.
  9. Paddan GS, Haward BM, Griffin MJ (1999). Hand transmitted vibration: Evaluation of some common sources of exposure in Great Britain. HSE Contract Research Report CRR 234/1999. HSE Books Sudbury, Suffolk. 
  10. Paddan GS, Haward BM, Griffin MJ (1999). Whole body vibration: Evaluation of some common sources of exposure in Great Britain. HSE Contract Research Report CRR 235/1999. HSE Books Sudbury, Suffolk. 
  11. Haward BM (1999). A study to investigate task performance difficulties among the crew of an FPSO vessel. Proceedings of the 34th meeting of the UK group on Human Response to Vibration, ISVR, University of Southampton, Southampton.
  12. Haward BM (1998). An evaluation of a trackball as an ergonomic intervention. Contemporary ergonomics 1998 (edited MA Hanson ) 135-139.
  13. Haward BM (1998). The assessment of hand function in subjects with vibration–induced upper limb conditions. Proceedings of the 33rd meeting of the UK group on Human Response to Vibration, Health and Safety Executive, Buxton.